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Nonprofitxpress Roundup – Canadian network grows

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In nonprofit news this week:

*A network of networks is emerging among voluntary groups in Canada, with 11 networks teaming up to create the Canadian Federation of Voluntary Sector Networks. Strengthening the impact of local, regional, provincial and territorial networks is the goal of the new federation, administered by the Centre for Voluntary Sector Research and Development of the University of Ottowa and Carleton University.

*The plunge in stock prices has hurt charity in Canada, The Globe and Mail reported Aug. 6. Their portfolios shrinking, foundations have curbed their grantmaking, while donors are delaying contributions or spreading them out over longer periods of time, while corporations that tie their charity to their profits are giving less.

*Living Cities, a partnership of foundations, financial institutions and the federal government, formerly known as the National Community Development Initiative, will double its investment over the next 10 years – to $500 million – to boost the revival of inner-cities.

*A fund created in January at the urging of the United Nations to fight AIDS and other infectious diseases has raised $2.1 billion, announced $1.6 billion in grants in 40 countries – but not given away even a penny, The Wall Street Journal reported Aug. 5.

*The U.S. Agency for International Development will award up to $100 million over five years to the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation for its Call to Action Project to prevent newborn babies in poor countries from becoming infected with HIV.

*A federal judge has ruled that Connecticut did not violate the rights of the Boy Scouts by dropping the charity from a list of groups to which state employees give through payroll deduction, the Associated Press reported July 29.

*Jewish charities are cutting programs and dropping insurance coverage in the face of soaring insurance premiums caused by fears their buildings could be targets of terrorists, the Associated Press reported Aug. 5.

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