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Notices for 9-27-02

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  • RALEIGH- For the fifth consecutive year, Smart Start has exceeded its fundraising goal. In 2001-02, Smart Start partnerships and the North Carolina Partnership for Children acquired more than $46 million in private support-far exceeding its goal of $20.9 million. Since 1995, Smart Start has raised nearly $177 million. “Private support is critical to the future of Smart Start,” said Karen Ponder, executive director of the North Carolina Partnership for Children, the nonprofit that oversees the Smart Start initiative. “As state funds are decreasing, the needs of young children are increasing. It is the support of large and small donors alike, that allow Smart Start to continue to provide a high level of quality services for North Carolina’s young children and families.” As a public-private partnership, Smart Start is required by legislation to raise $1 for every $10 it receives in state funds. Cash and in-kind contributions, as well as volunteer hours, are included in the fundraising total. Smart Start’s National Technical Assistance Center (NTAC) brought in Smart Start’s largest contributions of 2002 to assist other states in creating early childhood initiatives like Smart Start. NTAC is supported through more than $3 million in grants from David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Park Foundation and Carnegie Corporation of New York. Other major 2002 contributors include: Duke Endowment, Duke Energy Foundation, Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Wachovia Foundation, Bank of America and First Union Foundation. Smart Start is North Carolina’s nationally-recognized early childhood initiative to ensure children are healthy and ready to succeed when they enter school. Eighty-two Smart Start partnerships throughout North Carolina identify the needs of their communities’ young children and fund programs to meet those needs. Smart Start programs focus on improving the quality, affordability and availability of child care, providing support for families and increasing access to health services. For information on Smart Start’s fundraising efforts, contact North Carolina Partnership for Children
  • INDEPENDENT SECTOR will award the first-place prize of the 2002 Virginia A. Hodgkinson Research Prize to Jennifer Brinkerhoff of George Washington University, Derick Brinkerhoff and co-authors for their research journal entitled, Government-Nonprofit Relations in Comparative Perspective. Government-Nonprofit Relations in Comparative Perspective, a special issue of the journal Public Administration and Development, gives a comprehensive picture of the scope of government and nonprofit relationships. A key focus of the journal is to enhance understanding of how government and nonprofits interact and assess those interactions to measure how well they provide responsive solutions to societal problems. Government-Nonprofit Relations also addresses the varied expectations of the nonprofit sector held by multiple audiences and defines the distinct differences between the public and private sectors. Other contributors to this edition include: Dennis Bouget, Lori Brainard, Arthur Goldsmith, Juliet Musso, and Philip Warin. Prior to nomination for the Virginia A. Hodgkinson Research Prize, Government-Nonprofit Relations in Comparative Perspective was presented at an international research symposium held in France and
  • More than 175 staff and volunteers from the YMCA of the Triangle and the Garner Road Family YMCA will gather at the Embassy Suites in Cary at 6:30 p.m. on Tues., Oct. 8, 2002 to kick off their annual WeBuildPeople Campaign. Through the WeBuildPeople Program, the YMCA provides financial assistance to and outreach programs for those who would otherwise not be able to afford a YMCA experience. Jim Goodmon, President and CEO of the Capitol Broadcasting Company and the association campaign chair for a second year, will preside over the event. In rather prophetic remarks made at last year’s kickoff, Goodmon addressed concerns the volunteers might have about the possible negative affects the economic downturn may have on local charitable giving, “We are making the right investment. What’s the best investment? I think we should all invest in futures – not in stock market futures, but in the futures of the community. Pay attention to the children in your community – that’s the only way I can think of to make the future any better.” The WeBuildPeople (WBP) Campaign is the YMCA’s annual community-wide effort to raise funds for children, teens, families, and adults who otherwise cannot afford YMCA programs or services. Together the organizations will raise over $2.4 million to help more than 7,000 people in need through YMCA outreach programs and financial assistance.
  • The Christian Community Development Association (CCDA), Chicago, is pleased to announce the appointment of Gordon Murphy to the newly created position of executive director. Mr. Murphy, currently chief operating officer for Opportunity International, Oak Brook, IL, and the former general manager for Vision Chicago/World Vision, will assume his new position on September 16th, 2002. CCDA, an association of nearly 500 member organizations in over 100 cities and 35 states, works together with Christian community development ministries to mobilize spiritual and physical resources in and for communities through the Church in a community-determined way. As executive director for CCDA, Mr. Murphy will be responsible for developing and implementing a transition plan for moving CCDA to an association model, and establishing a 24 month Operating Plan, including key process and system upgrades. He will also work with the board of directors in developing a 5-year strategic plan, and spearhead the development and management of specific strategies and tactics required to accomplish the goals and objectives of the plan. In addition, Mr. Murphy will also develop and oversee the implementation of member-driven programs and services.
  • CYMA Systems, Inc., a leading developer of not-for-profit accounting software has announced a grant program for charitable organizations with less than $5,000,000 in annual revenue. Under the grant program, CYMA will provide funding for up to $5,000 in accounting software and services to qualifying 501(c)(3) organizations. Under the program, grant proceeds are used to acquire CYMA not-for-profit accounting software, CYMA support services, training and third party software from Pervasive Software and Synex Systems. The grant program is limited to 500 recipients and applications must be received by December 31, 2002. Interested non-profit organizations can reach CYMA at 800-292-2962 or at our website.

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