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Telemarketers clean up

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* Massachusetts charities paid telemarketers an average of 71 cents of each $1 raised during fundraising efforts last year, similar to previous years, a report by the state attorney general said, but more than the 60 cents for each $1 recommended by watchdog groups, the Boston Globe reported Dec. 10.

* Some anti-gay groups believe Target banned Salvation Army kettle ringers from its properties this year in response to pressure from gay activists that oppose the charity’s policy against providing domestic-partner benefits for employees, Agape Press reported Dec. 15.

* The former head of the James Beard Foundation was arrested and charged with second-degree grand larceny stemming from alleged use of foundation funds to cover credit card debt, theft of money from petty cash and filing false expense reports, the New York Times reported Dec. 14.

* The Salvation Army is swapping mechanized cardboard cutouts for real kettle ringers in 14 states in response to a shortage of volunteers, the Chicago Tribune reported Dec. 15, while thefts of Salvation Army kettles are up this year in British Columbia and Ontario, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reported Dec. 15.

* The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation plans to build its headquarters campus on 12 acres of city property near the Seattle Center, a deal worth an estimated $40 to $50 million, with the city pitching in a $20 million parking deck, the Seattle Times reported Dec. 16.

* More retailers are providing shoppers with opportunities to give to charity this year, including Nike and Discovery Channel, which have sold some of the 28 million $1 yellow Lance Armstrong Live Strong bracelets to finance cancer research, and The Gap, which is selling teddy bears to buy coats for poor children, efforts that also attract customers into stores, the New York Times reported Dec. 16.

* Canada’s next federal budget is expected to include tax incentives to boost Canadian giving, which lags behind the Britain and U.S., including eliminating the 25 percent capital-gains tax on securities donations, ending the requirements that charities provide receipts for donations under $250, and allowing donors to file donations made within 60 days after year-end, the Canadian Press reported Dec. 15.

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