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Leadership statistics

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NONPROFIT BURNOUT

  • Executives who:
    • Expect to leave jobs within five years: 75 percent
    • Leave jobs annually: 9 percent
    • Eventually are fired or forced out of job: 33.3 percent
    • Have discussed succession plan with boards: 29 percent
    • Stay in nonprofit sector after leaving jobs: 70 percent
    • Strongly agree their boards challenge them in ways to make them more effective: 33.3 percent
    • Strongly agree their funders have good understanding of nonprofit executive job: 33.3 percent

Source: Daring to Lead 2006: A National Study of Executive Leadership – A Joint Project of Compasspoint Nonprofit Services and The Meyer Foundation


EXECUTIVE PROFILES

  • Gender
    • Women: 66 percent
    • Men: 34 percent
  • Age
    • Under age 40: 18 percent
    • Age 40 to 49: 25 percent
    • Age 50 to 59: 41 percent
    • Age 60 to 69: 15 percent
    • Age 70 and older: 1 percent
  • Race/ethnicity
    • White: 82 percent
    • African American: 7 percent
    • Latino: 4 percent
    • Asian Pacific Islander: 4 percent
    • Other: 3 percent
  • Country of origin
    • U.S.: 92 percent
    • Other countries: 8 percent
  • For-profit management experience
    • No: 57 percent
    • Yes: 43 percent
  • Highest level of education completed
    • High School: 6 percent
    • Bachelor’s: 32 percent
    • Master’s: 49 percent
    • PhD or other advanced degree: 13 percent
  • Nonprofit sector experience
    • None to 5 years: 16 percent
    • 6 to 10 years: 18 percent
    • 11 to 20 years: 33 percent
    • 21 or more years: 33 percent
  • Years in current job
    • Less than 2 years: 20 percent
    • 2 to 5 years: 30 percent
    • 5 to 8 years: 18 percent
    • 8 to 11 years: 11 percent
    • 12 years or more: 21 percent
  • Public sector management experience
    • No: 79 percent
    • Yes: 21 percent
  • Prior nonprofit executive experience
    • No: 70 percent
    • Yes: 30 percent

Source: Daring to Lead 2006: A National Study of Executive Leadership – A Joint Project of Compasspoint Nonprofit Services and The Meyer Foundation


NONPROFIT GOVERNANCE

  • Annual salaries, nonprofit chief executives reporting to survey:
    • $50,000 to $100,000: 46 percent
    • Under $50,000: 29 percent
    • Over $100,000: 25 percent
  • Chief executives’ tenure:
    • Over 5 years: 54 percent
    • Three to five years: 17 percent
    • Three years or less: 29 percent
  • Chief executives’ seat or vote on board:
    • No board seat: 82 percent
    • A vote on board: 18 percent
      • Up from 9 percent, 1994
  • Average board size: 17 members, 2004
    • Down from 19 members, 1994
  • Organizations with larger budgets tend to have larger boards
  • Board membership by:
    • Gender
      • Men: 55 percent
      • Women: 45 percent
    • Race/ethnicity
      • White: 91 percent
      • Black: 4 percent
      • Latino or Hispanic: 2 percent
      • Asian American: 1 percent
      • Native American: 1 percent
      • Other: 1 percent
    • Age
      • 40 to 59: 64 percent
      • 60 to 69: 15 percent
      • 70 and older: 5 percent
      • Under 30: 2 percent
    • Field
      • For-profit world: 40 percent
        • Down from 54 percent in 1996
      • Nonprofit world: 18 percent
      • Self-employed: 14 percent
      • Retired: 13 percent
  • Top three criteria for selecting board members
    • Commitment to mission
    • Professional skills
    • Community visibility
  • Frequency of meetings:
    • Monthly: 41 percent
    • Bimonthly: 25 percent
    • Quarterly: 24 percent
  • Audits
    • 84 percent of boards hire auditor to conduct annual external financial audit
    • 18 percent have audit committee
  • Conflict-of-interest policy
    • 76 percent of boards
      • Up from 61 percent in 1994
  • Directors’ and officers’ liability insurance
    • 87 percent of organizations
      • Up from 76 percent in 1994
  • Fee or honorarium paid to board members for service
    • 2 percent
  • Evaluation of chief executive
    • 80 percent of boards conduct annually
  • Organizations requiring board members to:
    • Identify donors and/or solicit funds: 57 percent
    • Attend fundraising events: 57 percent
    • Make personal monetary contribution: 55 percent
  • Boards that assess own performance: 43 percent
    • Up from 38 percent in 1999
    • Up from 23 percent in 1994
  • Chief executive and board members generally agree board performance is:
    • Strongest in understanding organization’s mission and financial situation
    • Weakest in understanding individual responsibilities and making personal commitment

Source: Nonprofit Governance Index 2004, BoardSource

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