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Working smarter with online donor services

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[Publisher’s note: The Philanthropy Journal does not necessarily endorse the opinions, products or services offered or cited in this paid advertorial.]

By Kathleen Krais

Since 1984, the Community Foundation of Broward’s mission has been to provide leadership on community solutions and foster philanthropy to connect people who care with causes that matter.

Over the years, it has become the “go-to” place for philanthropy in Broward County.

“Over the past decade or so, we’ve seen that technology is no longer this ‘thing’ that we do,” noted Linda Carter, President/CEO for the Community Foundation of Broward.

“Rather, it is integrated into the way we do business.”

Currently, the foundation is embracing technology to improve its business.

Through a strategic investment with MicroEdge to enhance DonorCentral® functionality, new Web-based services will enable the foundation to provide every donor advisor with targeted, online information about projects within causes that are near and dear to them.

In a sense, it’s one-stop shopping for philanthropy — donors can receive information about specific focus areas and make advisements online, enabling effective and timely decisions for the causes they wish to support.

Equally exciting is how Community Foundation of Broward plans to use these same services to enable every staff member to gain greater knowledge of the many projects and organizations in need of attention within the community.

With $4 million worth of grants distributed to the community last year, it can be challenging to organize and disseminate information on every project and nonprofit.

Yet the foundation strives to provide each and every donor with individual attention, ensuring that their funds are used as effectively as possible within the community.

“DonorCentral provides our staff with immediate and deep proficiency about a large number of causes, and it allows our donors to sustain projects that are in need of funding on a timelier basis,” says Carter.

“Plus, if we can better educate our donor community about projects that need to be funded,” she says, “as a foundation we can use our unrestricted funds to do more things in the community, allowing us to utilize our resources in the right capacity.”

For more information, or to read other similar stories, visit www.microedge.com


Kathleen Krais is a freelance writer.

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