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Nonprofit jobs flush in Maryland

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Between 1995 and 2005, nonprofit employment in Maryland grew more than twice as fast as jobs in the for-profit sector, a recent report says.

Nonprofit jobs grew 36 percent during that period, compared to growth of only 15.3 percent in the private sector, says the annual Maryland Nonprofit Employment Update, a survey of state data released by the Center for Civil Society Studies at John Hopkins University.

By the end of 2005, this growth had driven sector totals to 237,246 jobs, the study says.

Currently, nonprofits account for one of every 11 jobs in Maryland, or 9.4 percent, significantly above the national average of 7.2 percent.

The growth is striking when compared to the usual big hirers of the private sector.

In Maryland, nonprofits employ five times as many people as the information industry, twice as many as the finance and insurance sector, and a third more than construction companies.

The report also says nonprofit wages topped out at $9.9 billion in 2005, 8 percent of state payroll totals, for an estimated $450 million of personal income-tax revenue directed towards state and local government coffers.

Federal tax revenues from Maryland’s nonprofit employees were $1.9 billion.

Following a trend of the increasing suburbanization of nonprofit jobs across the U.S., the study highlights particularly strong growth in nonprofit employment in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore suburbs.

By 2005, these areas accounted for 52 percent of nonprofit jobs statewide, the survey says.

Researchers say nonprofit jobs are spread across a number of fields in Maryland.

Hospitals are the largest nonprofit employer at 38 percent, followed by education at 18 percent, nursing and residential care at 13 percent and social assistance at 11 percent.

The study was compiled based on reports filed by employers with the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, and is part of the John Hopkins’ Nonprofit Economic Data Project.

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