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Nonprofit news roundup for Oct. 29, 2008

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Foundation wins small victory in court battle

An Alameda County Superior Court judge has thrown out a lawsuit filed by the father of a deceased donor to the Oakland, Calif.-based East Bay Community Foundation, The Mercury News reported Oct. 28 (see lawsuit story). Thomas Gonzales, whose son left about $23 million to the foundation when he died at age 35, sued to dissolve the Gonzales Foundation and keep the funds from going to the East Bay foundation. The lawsuit was in response to another lawsuit filed by the community foundation in 2006 against Gonzales, accusing him of mismanaging or hiding millions of dollars from his son’s estate. Gonzales argues that his son wanted his estate to go to family and friends first.

Scottish businessman encourages schoolchildren to give back

Ian Wood, chairman of one of the largest energy-services companies in the United Kingdom and one of Scotland’s richest businessmen, has given thousands of pounds to several city schools in Aberdeen for schoolchildren to donate to charities of their choice, BBC reported Oct. 29 (see children story). Wood, whose charitable trust has given £2 million, or about $3.2 million, to charity since its inception last year, plans to invest £50 million, or about $80.2 million, in charities over the next 10 years.

In Brief:

* The Heinz Endowments plans to give more than $10 million in grants to Pittsburgh public schools and other related organizations to fund scholarships and arts-education programs, The Pittsburgh Business Times reported Oct. 28.

* The Wallace Foundation has given a $1.2 million grant to the Los Angeles County Arts Commission and a $600,000 planning grant to the Los Angeles Unified School District to fund arts-education programs for children, Mary MacVean says in a blog on The Los Angeles Times website Oct. 28.

* In the wake of the credit crisis, environmental nonprofits are worried Americans will not only tighten their belts, but also put environmental issues on the back burner, The New York Times reported Oct. 29.

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